Fri 31 May 2013: 9.00am @ DBS CR2: Daniel Ng on “Impacts of climate change on tropical amphibians”

Pre-thesis
“Impacts of climate change on tropical amphibians”

Daniel Ng

Ng Jia Jun Daniel
Graduate Student
Dept. of Biological Sciences, NUS

Fri, 31 May 2013: 9.00am
@ DBS Conference Room 2 (S1 Level 3, Mezzanine)
Supervisor: Asst Prof David Patrick Bickford

All are welcome

Abstract:

“Amphibians are the most threatened with extinction of all vertebrate groups and many populations are declining around the world. Climate change has been implicated in their disappearance and the effects of climate change include increased temperature and rainfall variability. These changes are particularly detrimental to amphibians because of their bi-phasic life history and physiology.

Tropical amphibians are especially vulnerable as they are close to their physiological thermal limits and small temperature increases can exceed their thermal tolerance. In my PhD, I  assess which amphibian species in Singapore are most vulnerable to climate change; determine whether amphibian declines are also occurring in Singapore; investigate warming vulnerability between tropical amphibian communities compared to subtropical or temperate counterparts; ascertain effects of elevated temperature and interaction with pH.

Main findings suggest that while some tropical amphibian species may be more tolerant to climatic warming than previously hypothesised, some species appear to be vulnerable to climate change. In addition, synergistic interaction between high temperature and low pH in reducing survival was observed. These findings will have implications for conservation planning efforts.”

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