Mandai Mangrove and Mudflat Workshop, Sat 31 Aug 2013 @ NUS LT25

All ready for tomorrow!

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Custom print for LSM1103 Biodiversity in the Science Co-cop!

Students may use either Solomon, Berg & Martin’s Biology (9th Edition) or Reece et al.’s Campbell Biology (9th Edition) for LSM1103 Biodiversity. Since the module only requires Part V of these texts, we arranged with publishers for a lighter and cheaper bundle of the print copy of part V and the e-book.

The book arrived early this week and I dropped in at the co-cop to take a look. Sure enough, they are right there at the entrance.

Biology textbooks for LSM1103

[1] Biology 9th edition by Eldra P. Solomon, Linda R. Berg, Diana W. Martin

  • The offer by Cengage Learning Asia will be about $35 (check co-op for the price)
  • The bundle contains 1) a black and white print copy of Part V: The Diversity of Life & 2) a 12-month validity of the full-colour e-version of the complete text book online

Solomon Biology Part V LSM1103.pdf (1 page)

[2] Campbell Biology, 9th Edition by Reece et al.

  • The offer by Pearson will be about $35 (check the co-op for the final)
  • The budge contains 1) a black and white print copy of Part V: The Diversity of Life & 2) a full-colour E-book of Part V (12-month validity).

Campbell Biology Part V

The final exam for LSM1103 is an open book exam. Students are allowed to bring textbooks and notes into the exam hall, but no electronic devices are allowed.

Related posts

  • “Yes, that “International Edition” can be used and sold in the US (says their Supreme Court),” by N. Sivasothi. Otteman speaks, 10 Jun 2013.
  • “Finally – custom print textbook + e-book bundle for LSM1103 Biodiversity!” By N. Sivasothi, NUS Biodiversity Crew, 30 Jul 2013.

Sheila Poo’s paper on parental care in the treefrog Chiromantis hansenae

Sheila (3)

Most people don’t think of frogs as being good parents, but in fact amphibians have a wide diversity of reproductive strategies, including guarding their eggs.

Sheila Poo, from the Evolutionary Ecology and Conservation Lab, just published her first paper entitled “The Adaptive Significance of Egg Attendance in a South-East Asian Tree Frog” in the journal Ethology.   For the past three years, she has been closely observing the treefrog Chiromantis hansenae in Thailand to find out about its life history and the role of parental care in larval survival.  Her study is the first to show that egg attendance by female C. hansenae plays a  critical role in offspring survivorship.

To find out more, get the paper here!

Sheila is currently in the field again in Thailand, hard at work collecting even more data.  Below is a short video with footage from her study site created by one of her field assistants, Adair McNear, giving a glimpse of what it is like working on these critters.

 

Congratulations Sheila, all the time you spent wading in ponds in the dark has paid off!