Fri 13 Jan 2017: 2.00pm @ DBS CFR2 – Pang Sook Cheng on Distribution and bionomics of Anopheles sinensis, and its role of the malaria transmission in Singapore

Image003PhD Defense Seminar cum Oral Examination

Distribution and bionomics of Anopheles sinensis, and its role of the malaria transmission in Singapore

Speaker: Pang Sook Cheng
(Graduate Student Dept. of Biological Sciences, NUS)
Date: 13 January 2017, Friday
Time: 2pm
Venue: DBS Conference Room II (S1 Level 3, mezzanine)
Supervisor: Assoc Prof Li Daiqin

All are welcome

Abstract – Research on Anopheles mosquitoes has always been of low priority due to the malaria free status of Singapore since 1982. However, Anopheles sinensis were persistently found in localized malaria outbreaks in 2009 and kick started the investigation on the distribution, bionomics and the role of malaria transmission of this species. In this study, we confirmed the presence of A.sinensis Form A and the possible absence of Form B in Singapore.

Anopheles sinensis Form A was experimentally incriminated as a Plasmodium vivax vector and were found to be anthropophilic. Being the most widespread anopheline, they were present in a third of the total investigated sites and were actively seeking host throughout the night, especially before 1.00am. In the wild, their abundance positively correlative with the average and minimum temperature, but not rainfall.

Basic biological characteristics of A. sinensis were also pursue to further understand the fundamental knowledge to epidemiology of malaria. This study has revealed that A. sinensis could pose a malaria threat in urban Singapore, if the risks are not managed.

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